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Heidi McLean

worker classification

Worker classification confusion, no more

Worker classification confusion, no more 6875 3958 Heidi McLean

If you manage a contingent workforce, you’ve thought a lot about worker classification, compliance, and risk. If you haven’t, but you do manage freelancers, then you are likely either willfully ignoring it, hoping it will go away (it won’t) or drinking too much. First, we’ll talk about why you should care about the subject. Then we’ll get to the good stuff: how to turn those overwhelmed-tears into tears-of- relief because you’ve found a solution and thereby saved your liver.

One of the most important and expensive reasons to pay close attention is because the IRS and DOL are, too. The independent workforce’s rapid growth means heightened scrutiny on accurate worker classification. Your risk of facing an audit has never been greater. At the same time, IRS guidelines are more complicated than ever.

HERE ARE FOUR TIPS TO TAKE THE STRESS OUT OF WORKER CLASSIFICATION:

1. Take a compliance crash course to determine whether your independent workers are truly independent

Independent Contractors (ICs) are self-employed, hired to do a specific job and paid specifically for that job. Unlike a regular employee, they pick their jobs and regularly move from client to client, business to business. Also referred to as freelancers, consultants and “1099’s”, they report the payments received as business income and pay self-employment taxes.

If the following statements are true for your independent contractors, you’re on the right track.

  • Your contractor has an established business entity, with a business name and EIN to which invoice payment is made
  • Your contractor provides services to other businesses outside your firm
  • Your IC provides certificates of insurance, including at the least, coverage for general liability insurance and workers’ comp insurance
  • You have a signed per project Agreement for Services between your company and the contractor

Check out our self-audit tool and learn about keeping your company within the confines of right and wrong.

2. Take preventative security measures to mitigate risk

Vendors to large corporations must be held accountable to any client security program that helps to protect the company from threats. PayReel has installed, and pays close attention to, strict security measures and the demands of our client security environments such as:

  • Expanded insurance policy packages necessary to manage various risks involved in working with contingent workers
  • HIPAA-based technology and operational security to protect your company’s and your workers’ information at the highest level
  • The ability to adapt to client security requirements and processes
  • Ongoing system testing to detect vulnerabilities, unauthorized access or malicious activity
  • Closed network and storage that maintains and protects data integrity
  • Employee management and awareness of employers’ physical goods such as laptops and key cards to limit unnecessary access to company information by contractors

3. Engage strategic partners

You don’t have to understand all the ins and outs of worker compliance, but someone making decisions does. A strategic partner helps ensure all your freelance contractors are properly classified by vetting the work, the worker’s role, evaluating the risk and making a classification decision. In the context of contingent workforce regulations, PayReel pays close attention to all employer obligations at the federal, state and local levels, including wage & hour rules, per diem, ACA tracking, and sick leave mandates. PayReel also covers the following:

  • Stay up to date with the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and closely manage all health benefits for its employees
  • Track and keep accurate records of all employees’ hours accrued, time used and sick leave available in order to maintain compliance with legislation in locales where sick leave is mandatory
  • Regularly monitor changing wage and hour laws, and stay ahead of the compliance curve related to minimum wage and overtime eligibility
  • Remember that an independent contractor’s classification might change depending on his or her engagement or project, and monitor the ongoing work environment to maintain compliance with classification regulations

The bottom line

This stuff matters and will bite you in the butt if you don’t get on top of it. But there is hope. If you don’t want to or don’t have time to learn all the ins and outs, we’ve already done that for our clients and can do it for your business. Talk to our team today to learn how you can avoid the risk of an audit.

About PayReel

At PayReel, we minimize the time and effort it takes to get you ready for your project, make sure you get paid quick and easy and have Client Relationship Managers on call around the clock to answer your questions. All you have to do is call 303-526-4900 or email us. The PayReel team makes event payroll easier, faster, and seamless.

The next time you work an event or a production, tell your supervisor you love working with the PayReel team.

home office solutions

Home office solutions for form and function

Home office solutions for form and function 3393 5090 Heidi McLean

The growing number of freelancers and independent contractors in recent years means that more and more people are working from home. While those unable to step away from their desks to do a load of laundry may have a little work-from-home envy, working from home has its challenges, too. A freelancer’s home office that is both inviting and conducive to being able to actually get work done is one of the most important ways to set yourself up for success.

Here are five tips for making your home office a place you want to spend your time:

1. Light up your life

The importance of good lighting cannot be overemphasized. Light your workspace appropriately for your task and also to limit eye strain. These tips, from eye care professionals, are more about function than fashion, but there is no end to lighting options that meet the needs while also allowing you to express your style.

2. Organize and de-clutter

When home offices become collecting places for clutter, you’ll end up resorting to a coffee shop or your dining room table. To combat this, you’ll need some organization techniques to keep everything in order, but don’t neglect the power of organizing’s less glamorous cousin: de-owning. De-own what you don’t need and you’ll free up your mind and creativity for the things that matter.

3. Invest in ergonomics

Sitting all day and staring at a screen is tougher on the body than it seems like it would be, but your body has a way of telling you (usually through pain and strain) that you need to do something differently. Consider ergonomic desks and monitors that allow you to look straight ahead. Here are some quick tips and OSHA provides a thorough checklist for safety in the office. Invest in your body’s future with exactly what you’ll need to be comfortable and position your body for success.

4. Accommodate your unique needs

If your space will never host a client or an overnight guest, feel free to make it a place just for you — even if that means including a spot for productivity-boosting naps. If, on the other hand, you’re going to have client meetings or use the space for multiple purposes, be sure you include the elements you’ll need to keep it from feeling like your clients are stepping into your bedroom.

5. And finally, add your style

The possibilities here are endless, but if you’re going to spend most of your awake time in your space, you should totally love it. Part of the benefit of working from home is being able to make it your own personalized home office. Here are some design tips/ideas and inspirational visual galleries for making your home office truly yours.

The bottom line

In her early days, J.K. Rowling wrote anonymously at a cafe and Stephen King set up a makeshift workspace in his laundry room. You don’t have to have a home office to get work done. Still, if you’re going to go to the trouble and expense of having a home office, make it worth it. Invest in lighting, workspace tools, and decor that make it functional and inviting. Because what’s the point of having a home office if you’re always escaping to work elsewhere?

 

About PayReel

At PayReel, we minimize the time and effort it takes to get you ready for your project, make sure you get paid quick and easy and have Client Relationship Managers on call around the clock to answer your questions. All you have to do is call 303-526-4900 or email us. The PayReel team makes event payroll easier, faster, and seamless.

The next time you work an event or a production, tell your supervisor you love working with the PayReel team.

hiring millennials

The avocado toast generation and the case for hiring Millennials

The avocado toast generation and the case for hiring Millennials 5397 3598 Heidi McLean

Gone are the days when you could rely on your workers to put in their time at the office and stay loyal to one company from cradle to grave. These self-indulgent, entitled youngsters want to get promoted just for showing up. Millennials want avocado on their toast, purpose in their jobs, and a healthy work/life balance. Ugh. Let’s put aside any bewilderment about the fancy toast and $5 lattés with frilly foam designs for a moment and consider the case for hiring Millennials–those born between 1981 and 1990:

 

  1. Millennials work hard

    Boomers may grimace and fight the urge to growl, “Pay attention!” when they see young, talented managers texting away in a meeting. But the truth is, Millennials work really hard. They may even be the most workaholic generation yet.

  2. Work/life balance is good for business

    It may come as a surprise that it’s just as hard for Millennials to achieve as anyone (noted above), but these young laborers do value a work/life balance. Facilitating and cultivating this balance is actually good for business.

  3. Diversity is good for business

    Each generation brings a unique set of attributes to the workplace that, properly interwoven, can create a focused, exuberant, high performing workplace. Keeping multi-generational workers engaged is the key. Engagement equals performance, and performance equals results.

  4. They’re the most highly-educated generation in history

    As education opportunities have opened up to men, women, and all ethnicities, this generation has become one of the most highly-educated of all time.

  5. They want to contribute to something that matters 

    People of any age will work their tails off if they’re personally connected to and inspired by their goal. They’ll give their best for something they believe in. Tap into that desire to work for a purpose, and you’ll access a goldmine of creativity, talent, and time

The bottom line

Avocado toast has become the shorthand for all that’s supposedly wrong with Millennials but it’s a tale as old as time. Until they’re the older generation, the young generation is always the worst. Through the lens of hindsight, the young rabble rousers of the 60s became celebrated flower children. Recognizing any generation’s weaknesses and strengths allows hiring managers to leverage those strengths to build a solid team.

 

About PayReel

At PayReel, we minimize the time and effort it takes to get you ready for your project, make sure you get paid quick and easy, and have Client Relationship Managers on call around the clock to answer your questions. All you have to do is call 303-526-4900 or email us. The PayReel team makes event payroll easier, faster, and seamless.

The next time you work an event or a production, tell your supervisor you love working with the PayReel team.

 

hiring contingent workers

Throwback Thursday: Hiring contingent workers pre e-anything

Throwback Thursday: Hiring contingent workers pre e-anything 4404 2477 Heidi McLean

On the rare occasion I pay a bill the old-fashioned way, I marvel. It wasn’t so very long ago that, for each bill, we’d sit down, handwrite a check, and then actually put it in the mail. Just as online bill pay has become the way of the modern world, so too have email, job boards, and social networking sites proven the ultimate gamechangers for hiring practices. They’ve made a once-tedious and manual task more efficient and also brought the phrases “freelance” and “work from home” or “work remotely” into our modern language and culture.

Hiring short-term engagements pre-electronic mail, pre E-lance, and pre e-anything was a totally different ballgame. As the founder of Crew Connection and PayReel, I’ve had a front row seat to that game and its remarkable evolution. It’s hard to believe we have gone from faxing and phoning to pointing and clicking in my personal 30 plus years in the business. It’s even harder to imagine the days before my involvement.

A brief history of hiring contingent workers pre-internet

Sometimes I wonder how anything got done before we had the power to hold the whole world wide web in our hands. But early hiring tools included job fairs, notices on community bulletin boards, government employment offices, or even a good old-fashioned “now hiring” sign. Here are some of the significant markers in the history of hiring contingent workers.

1800’s, “free lances” fight for pay: While freelancing as we know it today may feel like a rather new phenomenon, the word’s origins date as far back as the 1800s. Merriam Webster defines “free lances” as soldiers who sold their soldiering to the highest bidder.

1700s, “Help wanted” ads appear: The Boston News Letters began carrying ads in 1704. Paying by the word, employers put an ad in the classifieds and waited for a response via snail mail. One such ad, from 1892, would be subject to anti-discrimination laws today. It sought, “A young lady of German parentage; must be a 36 bust and understand bookkeeping on a small scale. 

1890, Consultancy and recruiting agencies incorporate: Before online databases, where you could vet and possibly even book talent from a pool of candidates in minutes, we had telephones. Hiring managers might reach for the Yellow Pages and start down the list of consultancy agencies. The very first of such, Arthur D. Little Inc., was founded in 1886 and incorporated in 1906. The company broadened over the years but at first focused on technical research. In a sense, as someone hired to do a very specific job, these early consultants were the first freelancers. Like today’s freelancers, they kept companies from having to hire full time. Similar firms cemented their place in the U.S. economy in the 1900s.

1980s, Fax machines take over office buildings: While inventor Alexander Bain first sent an image over wire in 1843, the fax machine didn’t make its way to frequent commercial use until the 1980s. These miracle workers reduced turnaround time by taking resumes out of mailboxes and into the printer room. Employment agencies (who still had to pull resumes from their giant paper databases) could now send candidate details to employers in minutes, leading to speedier vetting and hiring. While bulky by today’s standards, the fax machine was one of the early innovations that led to a greater efficiency in the hiring space.  

Significant moments in hiring contingent workers post-internet

Of course, with the internet, things really picked up. In evolutionary terms, it’s comparable to a leap from apehood to personhood.

1994, Email brings mail to inboxes everywhere: We all know what happened when email came out. The whole world changed. Suddenly, candidates could send resumes as digital files that were instantly received and could be printed in perfect quality. Individual candidates sent resumes as attachments and agents sent them to employers electronically, too, making rolodexes and endless file cabinets of resumes obsolete. This was the tool that made a paperless world imaginable.

1995-1998, Online job boards post positions: Yep, it’s the biggie. Platforms like CareerBuilder, HotJobs and Monster took over the internet. Email brought mailing resumes to a halt and then these job boards nearly replaced emailing. This is where filters that allowed hiring managers and recruiters to sort candidates (by skills and location, for example) came into play.

2003, Online interviewing tools : Video chat services such as Skype allowed recruitment agencies to conduct initial interviews online, no matter where in the world the candidate happened to be. This reduced travel costs and turnaround time. It also reduced dress time for the candidates, who only had to look professional from the waist up.

The bottom line

Companies have it so easy today. We go online, conduct a few video chats, or use a service like Crew Connection or Toptal, and then we have a very skilled and vetted professional within a matter of hours or days. Time and location are of no consequence. Technology really makes life more efficient. And yet, we’re all still as busy as ever. But that’s another story for another day.

 

About PayReel

Producing multimedia content and executing live events is chaotic. At PayReel, we make sure our clients are able to hire who they want, when they want and that everyone is paid properly. Leave the details up to the PayReel team so you can focus on pulling off a flawless production. Contact us anytime at 303-526-4900 or by emailing us here.

Relax. We got it.

sick leave

February 2018: Month in review

February 2018: Month in review 5808 3876 Heidi McLean

January took forever and February flew. Just like that, the second month of 2018 is over. Below are a few of the topics in employment and politics that made news in the shortest month of the year.

 

The FMLA turned 25…and had a quarter life crisis 

On Feb. 5th, 1993 the Family and Medical Leave Act, which gave employees job protection to care for sick family members, was enacted. Some of the questions coming up around its birthday are:

  1. Should that time off should be paid? It’s up for debate, but at least two Trumps and a Rubio say yes.
  2. Who qualifies as a family member? Austin’s guidelines leave room for interpretation.
  3. Does it go far enough to protect everyone, including low wage workers? And what about parents?
  4. Will the Koch brothers and cronies be able to win the fight against the aforementioned FMLA expansions?

 

People got sick…or at least sick of work

Thirty-precent of prison guards called in sick for Super Bowl Sunday. And it happens every year. But it turns out, the real problem may be that Americans don’t take enough sick leave. Meanwhile, Airlines sued Washington State over sick leave laws and Maryland’s sick leave laws got delayed in Senate.

Interns and ballers said “Show me the money!”

As Vogue took criticism for unpaid internships, Carmelo Anthony and others called the NCAA corrupt. It all brings up the bigger question: is it time to classify internships and treat college athletes like employees?

It was quite a month in employment. What stories caught your eye?

About PayReel

Producing multimedia content and executing live events can be chaotic. At PayReel, we make sure our clients are able to hire who they want, when they want and that everyone is paid properly. Leave the details up to the PayReel team so you can focus on pulling off a flawless production. Contact us anytime at 303-526-4900 or by emailing us here.

Relax. We got it.

women workers PayReel

States double down to support women workers

States double down to support women workers 3000 2000 Heidi McLean

Between the famous gender wage gap and a dead last ranking among developed countries for paid maternity leave, the United States isn’t winning the Olympic gold for female-friendly business practices. While the federal government is scrapping Obama-era changes aimed at promoting pay equity, some states are enacting new protections.

 

Protections for family

New York requires paid family leave. 

With a law that entitles men and women alike to paid leave, the operative word here is family. Eligible workers get 50% of their salaries (up to $652 a week) for eight weeks. Workers may take leave to bond with a new baby, adopt a child, or care for a sick family member. The law represents a step towards combating the so called “motherhood penalty” while also recognizing fathers and male caretakers. New York is now the fourth state (following California, New Jersey and Rhode Island) to offer similar protections.

Massachusetts and Vermont offer protections to pregnant and nursing workers.

In another attempt to combat the aforementioned penalty to those who are building their careers along with their families, Vermont and Massachusetts expanded protections for pregnant and breastfeeding workers.

Oregon requires greater schedule predictability. 

This law requires larger employers to give new hires more information about their schedules. While the approach may have unintended consequences, it’s based on the fact that unpredictable work schedules make the already difficult task of balancing family commitments especially hard. Companies must also provide workers plenty of advance notice regarding upcoming schedule changes.

Nevada provides time off for domestic violence victims.  

Beyond accommodating growing families and closing the wage gap, Nevada is taking protections to a whole new level. Their new law provides battery and assault victims with protections such as transfers, reassignments, and modified schedules.

 

Closing the pay gap

18 states raise minimum wage.

The reasons for the pay gap are layered and up for debate. Still, the fact remains: On average, women in the United States earn 80% of what men earn. Increasing the minimum wage in 18 states affects all minimum wage workers’ pocketbooks, and nearly two thirds of these workers are women.

Massachusetts requires equal pay for equal work.

The state joins a growing list and requires equal pay for equal work. Even though the Massachusetts law is considered one of the strongest of its type, it still doesn’t guarantee a true “fix” to the wage gap.

California prohibits questions on income history.

California follows Delaware and New York City and prohibits potential employers from asking applicants such questions. The theory here says asking for income history causes workers to be saddled with their wage gap from job to job.

 

The bottom line

These new laws attempt to protect women from damages to their career and income based on the simple fact that they often simultaneously build families and careers. We will watch how these new laws play out. In the meantime, it’s worth considering what Vermont (the state with the lowest gap) is doing and how other countries compare on the issue.

Note: Click here for an article (which we relied on heavily for our brief overview) with a more expansive view of each of these new laws.

 

About PayReel

At PayReel, we minimize the time and effort it takes to get you ready for your project, make sure you get paid quick and easy, and have Client Relationship Managers on call around the clock to answer your questions. All you have to do is call 303-526-4900 or email us. The PayReel team makes event payroll easier, faster, and seamless.

The next time you work an event or a production, tell your supervisor you love working with the PayReel team.

 

January 2018: The Month of Many Mondays

January 2018: The Month of Many Mondays 150 150 Heidi McLean

January 2018 is over (finally?) and it’s official: this year is already a doozy. It’s not that it’s all been bad, it’s just been…a lot. Below are a few (really, these are only a few) of the topics in employment, politics, and entertainment that made news in the first 31 days of 2018.

In employment

January 2nd ― A woman in Sydney wins a worker’s comp claim against Woolworths for a “savage bird attack.” Might sound crazy until you find out that the bird is responsible for injuries requiring treatment for at least 10 others.

January 12th ― Maryland passes the Maryland Healthy Working Families Act (“The Act”) and now requires paid sick and safe leave for companies with fewer than 15 employees. Maryland is the 9th state in the country to hop on the paid sick leave bandwagon.  

January 24thStarbucks announced, in addition to giving all domestic employees a raise, it’s giving baristas paid sick leave, stock grants, and parental leave (including for the parent who didn’t give birth).

In politics

January 13th ― Hawaii accidentally (debatable) sends a false ballistic missile alert, sending residents and visitors (i.e. anyone with a cell phone) into a panic.

38 minutes later ―Hawaii issues correction, sending said cell phone owners into false near-death induced soul-searching.

January 20th – The government shuts down.

January 22nd – The government reopens.

January 30th – The State of the Uniom…err Union address. Trump gets the introduction of a WWF fighter (see Fox’s highlight reel) and Democrats hold their applause (see CNN’s highlight reel).

In entertainment

January 28th – The Grammy’s: Where Bruno Mars and Kendrick Lamar cleaned house, James Corden brought down the house, and Hillary Clinton took yet another jab at the White House. And in a reminder that our culture still has a lot of work to do to get our proverbial house in order, Kesha offered a sharp rebuke to the tune of “Prayin’ and Janelle Monáe said, #Timesup.

January 31st – Super blue blood moon. A beautiful overachievement, 150 years in the making. Just like the month of January, the moon decides to pack all sorts of events into a short timeframe.

January 31st – The nation takes a deep breath, and a nap…before heading into month two. To which February said, “Hellooooo, Super Bowl!”

These are just some of the headlining moments of January. We can only guess what’s next. What makes your list of notable January headlines? Share in the comments below.

 

About PayReel

Producing multimedia content and executing live events can be chaotic. At PayReel, we make sure our clients are able to hire who they want, when they want and that everyone is paid properly. Leave the details up to the PayReel team so you can focus on pulling off a flawless production. Contact us anytime at 303-526-4900 or by emailing us here.

Relax. We got it.

contingent workforce

Questions we’re asking about the contingent workforce in 2018

Questions we’re asking about the contingent workforce in 2018 4412 2941 Heidi McLean

The relationship between workers, employers, and government regulations is a balancing act. Each affects the others as inter-connectedly as any of nature’s most delicate symbiotic relationships. The contingent workforce is changing the employer/employee landscape everywhere. Similarly, government changes in healthcare and tax codes are sending a ripple effect through the system. Here’s just a taste of what 2017 has us thinking about as we move into the New Year.

  1. Healthcare: The subject is one of the biggest debates of our time. In theory, the Affordable Care Act made working independently more feasible than ever. One question we face as the Trump Administration chips away at the ACA is whether contingent workers will need to return to employee status or stay in jobs they’d otherwise leave.
  2. Taxes: The theory behind the new tax code maintains that changes benefiting employers will make American businesses more competitive and give the US economy a boost. It remains to be seen how or if these benefits will translate to contingent workers’ wellbeing.
  3. Workers’ Rights and Employers’ rights: Uber and similar companies are going through the early rounds of redefining the legalities around the new landscape. Where do workers’ rights end and employers’ rights begin? It’s a question that will continue to be duked out in courtrooms in 2018.
  4. Natural disasters: 2017 was a record-breaking year for natural disasters. Hurricanes and immobilizing snowstorms can put independent workers out of work for a long time without the protection of an employer. Without some preventative planning, small businesses may be at risk for having to close doors altogether. 
  5. #MeToo: In a way that only social media can do, the #MeToo movement has given a loud voice to a quiet, but longstanding complaint. What was formally a pervasive problem across all industries is now the stuff of crumbling careers and sweeping policy change. In the wake of the attention, many big companies adjusted their events, including prohibiting booze, at their 2017 holiday parties in an effort to prevent any bad behavior.
  6. Paw-ternity leave? With the woman who was granted two days’ sick pay to care for ailing dog, 2017 has us wondering if paw-ternity leave will be yesterday’s headline and tomorrow’s standard practice.

These are some of the issues that made news in 2017 and will continue to shape the economic landscape. We can only guess what’s next, but there’s no doubt it’s a time of great change in the country and economy. What’s on your radar for the coming year?

About PayReel

Producing multimedia content and executing live events is chaotic. At PayReel, we make sure our clients are able to hire who they want, when they want and that everyone is paid properly. Leave the details up to the PayReel team so you can focus on pulling off a flawless production. Contact us anytime at 303-526-4900 or by emailing us here.

Relax. We got it.

 

 

 

 

An 11th hour gift guide for your favorite techie

An 11th hour gift guide for your favorite techie 150 150 Heidi McLean

PayReel gift guide

From turntables to everyone’s favorite OG droid: Everything old is new again. We work with techies both inside and outside the office every day and these are some of the gifts causing a buzz in our corner of the world. They’re sure to excite the technophile in your life.

  • The most endearing Star Wars droid of all time is short in stature and words, but not on sass. We can’t tell you if this Droid Inventor Kit is a secret ploy to save money on manufacturing by having you “invent” it, but we can tell you that there will be some PJ-clad Star Wars fans (and maybe their kids) putting together their very own R2-D2s next week about this time. Order today (12/19) on Amazon Prime and select one-day shipping or on the manufacturer’s site here by 12/20 to get in time for Christmas!
  • Coffee lovers have been foiled by one nemesis since the beginning of time: a tepid cup of joe. Now, you can ensure you get the hot beverage experience you’re looking for over and over again—sans the microwave. Some, like this Ember Ceramic mug—deemed best invention of 2017—even let you customize to your own personal temperature liking.
  • Whether you’re going for the sleek and stylish bluetooth bamboo Bongo speakers or a retro turntable with an updated twist, this is the year of smart, stylish speaker systems.
  • Ask any millennial and you’ll hear the same thing: the Bullet Journal will change your life. Just like pen and paper, the journal has been around awhile, but judging by its fans’ enthusiasm, it ain’t going anywhere. The journal itself isn’t the revolution, it’s the system. It is…get this…made of paper. Paired with a favorite pen, this journal promises increase your productivity in no time. It’s enough to convince even a dedicated paperless fan to reconsider.
  • For the spendier than average and super tech-forward home, consider lighting that pretends you’re home when you’re not (compatible with Apple Home), refrigerators that’ll order you a six pack, and thermostats that learn your patterns and adjust accordingly. Get ready for smart everything…and for the conspiracy theories from your friend who can’t stop talking about big brother.
  • And if you just need a laugh and a break from the hectic season, check out Stephen Colbert’s fake, but totally awesome Goop-inspired line of total malarkey.

Whether it’s smart and sustainable technology or inventor kits that are just plain fun, this holiday season is all about going retro, but with a smart twist. Stock up on gifts for your favorite techie or for yourself. Go ahead, put it under the tree and say it’s from Santa. We won’t tell.

 

About PayReel

Producing multimedia content and executing live events is chaotic. At PayReel, we make sure our clients are able to hire who they want, when they want and that everyone is paid properly. Leave the details up to the PayReel team so you can focus on pulling off a flawless production. Contact us anytime at 303-526-4900 or by emailing us here.

Relax. We got it.

 

 

 

 

open enrollment

Open enrollment ends Friday. Are you ready?

Open enrollment ends Friday. Are you ready? 3543 2362 Heidi McLean

While its future is uncertain, the healthcare marketplace is still up and running for now. So if you rely on the Affordable Care Act for your coverage, it’s time to get busy. We are now within the final hours of open enrollment for the healthcare marketplace.

 

Here are some answers to common questions:

  1. What if I already get my insurance through my employer? No need to read on. You’re good!
  2. What if I like my plan? If you’re already enrolled in a plan, haven’t had any major life changes (such as a pregnancy or a change in income), you can keep your plan. You don’t even need to log in.
  3. What if I have Medicaid coverage? You’re all set. Enjoy the rest of your day.
  4. What if I have coverage through my spouse’s plan? See ya later.
  5. Can I still get a subsidy if I have healthcare insurance through an existing employer? Maybe. Go to healthcare.gov and see if your income qualifies you for a healthcare subsidy. This could lower your cost for coverage. You can also use this calculator to estimate possible subsidies.
  6. What if I know I need to make a change and have been dragging my feet? If none of the above applies to you, it’s time to go shopping. Head to healthcare.gov and follow the instructions.
  7. How are rates determined? Plans come in four different levels: Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum. Some freelancers report being pleasantly surprised by the prices they’ve found in the marketplace, while other folks have used some pretty colorful language to describe the experience.Rates are unique to each person and vary based on factors such as where you live, how much income you bring in, and how many family members you have.
  8. How long do I have left? This year’s deadline is December 15th.
  9. What if the website takes forever to load? Especially near deadlines, the marketplace websites have been known to be overloaded, causing frustrating delays. If this happens, you may have better luck on the phone. Call 1-800-318-2596.

 

About PayReel

At PayReel, we minimize the time and effort it takes to get you ready for your project, make sure you get paid quick and easy, and have customer service agents on call around the clock to answer your questions. All you have to do is call 303-526-4900 or email us. The PayReel team makes event payroll easier, faster, and seamless.

The next time you work an event or a production, tell your supervisor you love working with the PayReel team.